High yield portfolio from scratch

Starting a high yield portfolio: Income for Life builds on RIRP

Starting a high yield portfolio: Income for Life builds on the success of RIRP.

This month’s liberalisation of the UK pension rules means that more investors will be looking to SIPPs – self-invested pension plans – to manage their retirement income and provide tax-free inheritances. Some will be looking at a high yield portfolio.

The sort of inflation-busting dividend increases which my Rising Income Retirement Portfolio (RIRP) has delivered over the past 7 years, coincidentally matched by increases in the capital value of the portfolio, is ideally suited to a SIPP, the sort of thing anyone can use when starting a new high yeld portfolio.

Some recent subscribers have said that while the thinking behind the existing RIRP may be interesting to read about, there is little actionable value from them in reports on the portfolio.

Since average yields on the shares in the RIRP at their current market prices are well below the yields on the original capital invested, is it too late to join the party?

I don’t think so, and so am rising to the challenge of starting a high yield portfolio with similar objectives, though it will differ from the RIRP in several respects. I am calling it the Income For Life (IFL) portfolio to emphasise the fact that I expect it to go on delivering (as does the RIRP) until the investor no longer has any reason to care.

The IFL’s short-term objective differs from the RIRP. It is designed to address the problems faced by investors needing to invest capital to secure an immediate income in a zero-rate environment. Some will be trying to replace fixed-term investments taken out when interest rates were nearer 5% pre-tax than today’s 3%.

As a result, the RIRP’s policy of a long-drawn out drip-feed investment designed to ride out market cycles has to be abandoned. This means investors will have to accept that if the bears are right, the IFL’s capital values could suffer – maybe for a period of years – while (I hope) the income continues to rise regardless. A factor to consider when starting a new high yield portfolio.

For those who worry about the FTSE 100 achieving its previous nominal peak, and who are aware that market peaks tend to attract the stupidest punters, I counter with the fact that to compensate for inflation since 1999 the index should be over 10,000, and that corporate earnings today are nearly twice what they were in 1999 in nominal terms. To my mind, there are no amber valuation lights flashing as there were in late 1999.
Initial 4% yield target

The IFL will invest a notional £100,000 over the coming 12 months, with the aim of delivering an income as close as possible to 4% net of basic rate tax over the coming year (the equivalent of 5% gross in interest), and higher than that in a full year, from shares likely to continue to raise their dividends on balance by the greater of the RPI or CPI.

The income target is a real challenge in the first year, largely because the gap between shares going ex-dividend and actually paying the money means investors cannot get a full year’s income for the first 12 months.

To maximise the first year income, my initial choices will therefore have more higher-yielding shares with poorer dividend growth prospects than my choices later in the year. And my investment timing will largely be determined by the dates on which the shares I select go ex-dividend. To this extent emotion will be removed from the market, at least for most of the initial year’s selections.

As with the RIRP, my selection of shares will always be from among those which I hold myself, some of which may also be duplicated in the IFL. Some may surprise, like Centrica, which recently announced a 30% dividend cut.

My initial rules banned companies that cut their dividends from the RIRP, but experience with L&G and United Utilities has made me revisit this. Now it seems that companies which “rebase” their dividends actually tend to show above-average dividend growth thereafter. The trick is to buy after their announcement, such as Centrica.

I shall aim to invest in no more than 20 shares for the IFL, which means a limit of £5,000 per share. Some investors with more to invest might like to hold more shares, so for this first instalment of the IFL I have provided a selection of 15 stocks to set the ball rolling, all of which are going ex-dividend over the coming three months.

My core selections for the 20-share IFL high yield portfolio I shall be reporting on in future are shown in bold in Table 1. They are a combination of the higher yielders and those I consider most likely to outstrip, rather than merely keep pace with, inflation.

Starting a high yield portfolio; The Income For Life Portfolio
The Income For Life Portfolio opening positions

As when building up the original RIRP we must keep our attention firmly fixed on the income stream we are building up for the future, disregarding what the capital value of the shares is doing: any capital growth is a bonus. This has certainly worked for RIRP: its original £99,442 is now worth around £158,000, with the few losers such as BP, Infinis, RSA and Sainsbury more than compensated for by those which have more than doubled in value such as BT, Interserve, L&G and Pearson.

I will add further stocks to IFL in July.

RIRP income storms ahead

In January I said that now the Rising Income Retirement Portfolio – my original high yield portfolio – had been fully invested for a year, I would adopt a much simpler and transparent method of accounting for its eighth year. The results are in Tables 2 and 3, which capture the fund’s key performance measures.

Column 1 of Table 2 shows the projected yield on the original sums invested for the year ahead, and column 2 shows the percentage increase in yield over the previous year for those companies that have so far announced rises. Table 3 shows what this means in money, but with special dividends and returns of capital now identified separately as “bonuses”.

Rising Income Retirement Portfolio
Rising Income Retirement Portfolio constituents

Last year these came from Vodafone and Direct Line. This year Direct Line has raised its basic dividends while declaring the same special as this time last year; and Standard Life has made a 73p a share return of capital to shareholders, which means the RIRP’s total income will be streaks ahead of last year’s.

Prudent investors will bank these bonuses against a rainy day; most of us will be tempted to spend them while we can enjoy them.

The SL scheme does entail a reduction in the number of SL shares the fund holds through a capital reduction, which I am happy to regard as simply increasing the average original purchase price; even with this self-deprecating accounting, I could still cash in the SL shares for nearly 90% more than my book cost. And clearly I am going to have no problems in achieving my original aim of increasing dividends by at least the higher of the rise in the RPI or the CPI; and my newly adopted aim of doubling the inflation figure looks easily achievable.

Rising Income Retirement Portfolio
Rising Income Retirement Portfolio performance to date

This is despite the fact that I am projecting a one third cut in Sainsbury’s final payout later this year, which may turn out over-optimistic. The return to the dividend lists by RSA and Lloyds so far only make a nominal cash contribution, but with a full year’s income from GlaxoSmithKline and a bumper dividend rise from Legal & General mean the fund’s underlying income will still rise by 2.4% – and we are only one month into the RIRP’s accounting year.

I am relieved that my fear of a rights issue from BT to fund its purchase of EE did not materialise. I am now getting a yield of over 5% on my original investment in this stock – though surprisingly, this is below the average projected underlying yield of 6.5% from the portfolio as a whole. If this year’s capital repayment from Standard Life is factored in, the projected yield on initial capital rises to over 8%.

Since I have chosen to treat these exceptional payments as bonuses from now on, I do not need to try to present this in future as a truly sustainable yield. Income rising at over twice the rate of inflation is good enough for me.

First published in The IRS Report on 4th April 2015.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Blue Captcha Image
Refresh

*